Preceptor Spotlight: Rob Daniels, PharmD

Preceptor Spotlight: Rob Daniels, PharmD

Rob Daniels, PharmD

Clinical Pharmacist – Pediatric Infectious Disease
Co-Director, Antimicrobial Stewardship Program
Palmetto Health Children’s Hospital, Columbia, SC

Dr. Daniels works at Palmetto Health Children’s Hospital as a clinical pharmacist specializing in pediatric infectious disease. He graduated with his PharmD in 2005 from the University of South Carolina College of Pharmacy. He then went onto train at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) in 2006. Dr. Daniels then returned to Columbia, SC to Palmetto Health Children’s Hospital where he was charged with implementing the first pediatric antimicrobial stewardship program in the Carolinas. He currently serves as the co-director as well as chair of the Infectious Disease Drug Specialty Team at Palmetto Health. His areas of interest include antimicrobial resistance, cystic fibrosis, and neonatal infections.

1. What are the most difficult aspects of being a preceptor? And how do you overcome these barriers?

Finding a good balance between daily demands of patient care and the ability to teach students while on rotation. It can sometimes seem that, as the patient load increases, the time to sit down and teach decreases. I try to incorporate as much teaching into our daily patient care rounds as I can. Our service usually consists of medical residents, medical students, pharmacy residents, and pharmacy students. This allows for great interdisciplinary teaching on a daily basis without the need to schedule topic discussions that may get cancelled or rushed based on other acute patient care demands. I have found that students also are much more engaged if they are discussing an infection that we are actively treating.

2. What do you value most about being a preceptor?

I enjoy getting an opportunity to teach students a subspecialty they don’t get much exposure to in their didactic courses. Most students start my rotation with a very basic database when it comes to pediatric infectious disease. I always enjoy seeing the progression students make throughout the month in their ability to work up and present the patients that they are following on rounds. Being able to train students in pediatric infectious disease and allow them the opportunity to take the knowledge they gain while on rotation to any practice setting is a valuable experience for me.

3. How do you judge a student’s success on your rotation?

I enjoy getting an opportunity to teach students a subspecialty they don’t get much exposure to in their didactic courses. Most students start my rotation with a very basic database when it comes to pediatric infectious disease. I always enjoy seeing the progression students make throughout the month in their ability to work up and present the patients that they are following on rounds. Being able to train students in pediatric infectious disease and allow them the opportunity to take the knowledge they gain while on rotation to any practice setting is a valuable experience for me.
I think, for myself, it’s very simple. If a student leaves my rotation with more knowledge and appreciation of pediatric infectious diseases then they had when they started the rotation, I feel that the month was a success. Most students who are successful on my rotation are excited to learn every day and take advantage of the opportunities that present themselves in pediatric infectious disease.